welcome to thisby
welcome to thisby
home to capaill uisce, november cakes, morrises, island ponies, and lovers of the scorpio races
Map of Thisby || Edits
1 of 179
50 minutes ago // gabriel connolly - + 20
1 hour ago // capaill uisce - the beach - c0untryside-melody + 465

horsesornothing:

lol i just saw this on facebook the other day but i couldn’t embed the video to share with you guys :( but hey, there’s a giftset. u go tumblr, u go

2 hours ago // barn cat - puffin - gif - lolgifs.net + 100240

studioghiblirocks:

welcometothisby:

roundaboutskarmouth:

wildthingsandwildkings:

221bentley:

welcometothisby:

wildthingsandwildkings:

welcometothisby:

Putting this here, because I think this idea is fascinating and I want to hear everyone’s thoughts on the matter!

I think of capaill uisce as being rather like polar bears. They’re perfectly capable of powerful movement on land, yet they spend most of their time at sea. So they must have some adaptions for living on both land and water—strong legs for propulsion or wider hooves, for example—and they could be either natural or magical, depending on how far you want to take the mythology. I think your idea of the fanned hooves seems very plausible either way!

This is making me wonder on whether they would just swim around in the ocean like fish, or if they would run on the ocean floor. And also, what your guys’s thoughts on their herd instinct? As in schools of capaill uisce swimming, or herd of them running around in the ocean!

I assumed they’d be like land horses in most ways, aside from, you know, the flesh-eating thing and the ocean thing. It’s that terrifying mix of familiar and foreign. I think they’d swim around like schools of fish, as horses are quite buoyant, but I don’t remember what the book says on the subject. I guess it’s time to go through it with a fine-toothed comb again!

I think capaill uisce being herd bound is plausible only to an extent since they are mostly equine but there’s a side of of me that thinks otherwise that they may be independent creatures because they are carnivorous. (I know this is straying away from any talk of hooves, but hear me out) As a horse owner myself, I know that horses, by nature, depend on each other for safety. They’re prey animals, they feed on grass, and there for, to be alone is to be vulnerable. Capaill uisce are carnivores and they are huge and strong. They hunt, not forage, and as we see on the beach, they have no problem turning against each other. So while they do fine in small groups away from the sea, I’ve noticed that because they are competitive they hunt alone, they emerge from the sea alone. So I guess reviewing this information, they don’t stay together on land so I don’t think they school together in the sea. Does this make sense to you?

Makes total sense, and I had these similar thoughts too, but then you get animals like lions who do hunt in packs, despite being dominant and competitive. Although I guess we’ll never know… Or someone should ask Maggie.

That is true… But as far as equine nature goes they’re a bit far way from lions. I’d love to talk to Maggie about the capaill uisce. :D

notpuckconnolly replied to your photo “Putting this here, because I think this idea is fascinating and I want…”

They could also have hooves that are lighter than ordinary hooves, but wider too, more like the feet of draft horses, which would allow for easier propulsion through the ocean.

Look at us, all theorizing about The Scorpio Races. I love us!

I’m going to add my thoughts to this.
I think they “change” a bit. The book mentions nostrils lengthening and such, so I think their hooves/legs might get fin type things. And their nostrils would become gills and their ears more fin-like. As for schooling, maybe they live together until the Scorpio time comes around. Maybe its like a mating season and they become more aggressive and hungry. Just my thoughts on this. :)

3 hours ago // capaill uisce - swapping stories - welcometothisby + 31
20 hours ago // the scorpio sea - vintage - premierepage + 679
hathawayland asked: ahh, hello there :) i just finished my fourth re-read of the scorpio races and still, it's honestly one of my favourite books in the world. i was just wondering if you have any theories as to where thisby is located (in terms of the 'real' world - some said close to england and ireland? thinking maybe sort of isle of man?) and what time period the book's set in? there's mention of the women's suffrage movement and just, yeah, i'd really like to hear your thoughts!

notpuckconnolly:

welcometothisby:

Welcome, friend! Even I haven’t read it that many times! I bet you have some great insights, and I hope you feeling like sharing them anytime you so desire. And that goes for everyone. I love talking about this magical book! Sometimes I wish Maggie had spelled things out a bit more but she did leave clues in the text, which I am hell-bent on finding and puzzling out. It’s a mountain I have to climb.

So. Location first!

  • It’s in the Atlantic (“shaking…the Atlantic from their hooves”). When Sean looks at the western horizon, he pictures that somewhere out there is “George Holly’s America.”
  • We’ve got Gaeilge words like capaill uisce, and the names of the islanders are primarily Irish (Connolly, Kendrick), with a bit of Scottish (Malvern, Carrick), English (Eaton, Privett) and Scandinavian (Palsson, Skata) sprinkled in.
  • It has chalk cliffs.

I’ve often thought that Thisby seemed similar to the Isle of Man. They’ve got Celtic-Anglo influences (and even some Norse connections). What’s more, there’s the Manx legend of the cabyll-ushtey. However, Maggie did say in an interview that she was going for “quasi-Irish or Scottish,” though I’ll never be able to shake the English connection entirely due to the audiobook and her Yorkshire photos.

Now, I’m not satisfied to leave it at “quasi-Irish or Scottish” because I obsess about things. It’s what I do. This brings us to the issue of chalk. The Chalk Group primarily exists in southern and eastern England, but there is one tiny part of Northern Ireland where similar chalk cliffs can also be found: the Antrim coast. I see Thisby as being somewhere off the coast of Northern Island, betwixt the Atlantic and the North Channel of the Irish Sea, which would account for cultural influences, geography, and geology. The closest real-world equivalent I’ve found is Rathlin Island, which just happens to boast chalk cliffs, sea caves, ferries, and a connection to St. Columba. Too bad it’s home to 100 and not 4,000 people.

And now the time period!

I’ve written a little about fashion, cars, wars, and attitudes here, but I’ll always have more thoughts on the matter. Right now I want to focus on this quote:

  • “I had been to the mainland once with my father, for one of the races there. It was vests and flat caps and bowlers and canes…and wives who looked like dolls.”

Bowler hats found their peak popularity between the mid 1800s and the 1930s. The “wives who looked like dolls” bit is interesting, because the elaborate clothes of the Edwardian period and the 1910s looked ever so doll-like and women’s fashion had seriously relaxed by the 1920s.

This makes me think that this event happened pre-1920s, and as it is before Mr. Kendrick died, Sean can be no older than 10 years old. Flash forward to Thomas Gratton and “his big sheep truck, a Bedford whose headlights and grille make it look like Finn when he’s making his frog face.” The first Bedford was produced in 1931. So, supposing the book takes place in the early 1930s, the timing works out perfectly for Sean to have visited the mainland as a young child in the late 1910s.

This timing also works with the reporter’s question about Puck being inspired by the women’s suffrage movement. Women in Northern Ireland, along with the rest of the UK, didn’t get the unqualified vote until 1928. I can’t really see the reporter saying anything like that any later than the 1930s; soon after, the term “feminism” became more common and then we get into WWII where the landscape of women’s rights changes once again.

So, all that to say, I imagine Thisby is located off the coast of Northern Ireland and that the story takes place in the early 1930s. I might set it slightly earlier if it weren’t for that truck!

A hundred November cakes to anyone who was able to sit through my rambling essay! A hundred more if you’ll tell me your theories!

GENIUS. ABSOLUTELY BRILLIANT. I HAD IT PINNED NEAR IRELAND (in fact, have used Google Earth to hunt out possible islands) and before the 1940s, glad someone worked it out so precisely however. :D

I’m always curious to find out when and where people think it’s set because it’s not spelled out in the book. I could be completely misreading the clues, but I’m glad my theories are making sense to people! :)

21 hours ago // setting - swapping stories - welcometothisby + 37

afleetalexandra:

Australian champion Phar Lap with a little friend

22 hours ago // the mainland - the races - malvern stock - vintage - afleetalexandra + 119

If you lived in the world of THE SCORPIO RACES, would you rather…?

notpuckconnolly:

welcometothisby:

  • A.) Be born and bred on Thisby. And die there, too. Most likely sooner rather than later.
  • B.) Spend a pretty penny and visit once a year as a tourist from the mainland.
  • C.) Come from the mainland and end up staying after some sort of spiritual conversion in the waters near Skarmouth (you may have to give up your lovely red car).
  • D.) Escape to the mainland as soon as you can and promise to visit your wretched relatives on Thisby at Easter (probably you won’t).

A. Definitely A. I am homesick for a place I have not ever seen.

Thisby is proud to call you one of her own!

23 hours ago // thisby census - swapping stories - welcometothisby + 30
23 hours ago // capaill uisce - Flickr / astral_deer + 239

roundaboutskarmouth:

wildthingsandwildkings:

221bentley:

welcometothisby:

wildthingsandwildkings:

welcometothisby:

Putting this here, because I think this idea is fascinating and I want to hear everyone’s thoughts on the matter!

I think of capaill uisce as being rather like polar bears. They’re perfectly capable of powerful movement on land, yet they spend most of their time at sea. So they must have some adaptions for living on both land and water—strong legs for propulsion or wider hooves, for example—and they could be either natural or magical, depending on how far you want to take the mythology. I think your idea of the fanned hooves seems very plausible either way!

This is making me wonder on whether they would just swim around in the ocean like fish, or if they would run on the ocean floor. And also, what your guys’s thoughts on their herd instinct? As in schools of capaill uisce swimming, or herd of them running around in the ocean!

I assumed they’d be like land horses in most ways, aside from, you know, the flesh-eating thing and the ocean thing. It’s that terrifying mix of familiar and foreign. I think they’d swim around like schools of fish, as horses are quite buoyant, but I don’t remember what the book says on the subject. I guess it’s time to go through it with a fine-toothed comb again!

I think capaill uisce being herd bound is plausible only to an extent since they are mostly equine but there’s a side of of me that thinks otherwise that they may be independent creatures because they are carnivorous. (I know this is straying away from any talk of hooves, but hear me out) As a horse owner myself, I know that horses, by nature, depend on each other for safety. They’re prey animals, they feed on grass, and there for, to be alone is to be vulnerable. Capaill uisce are carnivores and they are huge and strong. They hunt, not forage, and as we see on the beach, they have no problem turning against each other. So while they do fine in small groups away from the sea, I’ve noticed that because they are competitive they hunt alone, they emerge from the sea alone. So I guess reviewing this information, they don’t stay together on land so I don’t think they school together in the sea. Does this make sense to you?

Makes total sense, and I had these similar thoughts too, but then you get animals like lions who do hunt in packs, despite being dominant and competitive. Although I guess we’ll never know… Or someone should ask Maggie.

That is true… But as far as equine nature goes they’re a bit far way from lions. I’d love to talk to Maggie about the capaill uisce. :D

notpuckconnolly replied to your photo “Putting this here, because I think this idea is fascinating and I want…”

They could also have hooves that are lighter than ordinary hooves, but wider too, more like the feet of draft horses, which would allow for easier propulsion through the ocean.

Look at us, all theorizing about The Scorpio Races. I love us!

1 day ago // capaill uisce - swapping stories - welcometothisby + 31